Environment

Burning, polluted rivers and visibly polluted air were some of the factors that led to the first major environmental laws in our country. Environment and public health are closely linked and although the days of pouring chemicals into waterways and air pollution as thick as pea soup have passed there are still many challenges facing our environment and affecting public health. Aging transportation and water systems should be replaced to improve air and water quality. We need to protect our National Parks and other American public lands in order to preserve the unique diversity of plant and animal life, as well as our cultural heritage. And we should work to develop our cities, communities and rural areas more sustainably, including with more sustainable agricultural practices.

More on Environment

December 21, 2020 Press Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. – SEEC Co-Chairs Reps. Doris Matsui, Gerry Connolly and Paul Tonko made the following statement in response to the passage of SEEC priorities in the end-of-year-funding package.
December 18, 2020 Press Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. – SEEC Co-Chairs Reps. Gerry Connolly, Paul Tonko and Doris Matsui made the following statement in response to the announcement that the Biden-Harris Adminstration will nominate SEEC Member Rep. Deb Haaland for the role of Interior Secretary.
July 1, 2020 Press Release
Washington D.C. – Today the leaders of the House Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition (SEEC) made the following statement in response to the passage of H.R. 2, the Moving Forward Act in the U.S. House of Representatives:
June 22, 2020 In The News
As Rep. Chellie Pingree and other leaders of the House Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition said in a letter Monday, this is a rare opportunity to remake America’s economy in a more energy-efficient way. The group listed numerous bills and administrative actions that should be taken as the country responds to, and ultimately emerges from, the coronavirus pandemic. These include dedicated support for the clean energy sector — and its more than 3 million employees — in any future relief packages that are passed by Congress. They also suggest changes to tax incentives, loan programs and federal funding for renewable energy, water treatment, transportation infrastructure, land conservation and others. They also highlight how federal investments, clean energy and environmental protection are intertwined with concerns about racial and economic inequality and justice. There is an urgency to this work. World leaders have a short time — perhaps only six months — to capitalize on the carbon dioxide emission reductions that have accompanied the pandemic, an international energy expert told the Guardian newspaper.
June 18, 2020 Press Release
Washington D.C. – Today, the leaders of the House Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition (SEEC) sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, and House Committee Chairs calling for sustainable relief and recovery legislation in response to the COVID-19 crisis.
May 20, 2020 In The News
Setting their sights on a fifth coronavirus economic relief package, the leaders of the House sustainability coalition are drafting an outline of clean energy, infrastructure and other climate priorities to share with the chamber’s leadership. Rep. A. Donald McEachin (D-Va.) said in a statement that the House Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition “will continue to strongly advocate for clean energy policies that support workers and family-sustaining jobs, along with other sustainability policies that advance the cause of environmental justice and promote the development of sustainable infrastructure.” McEachin, a vice chair of the coalition, confirmed that the group is staying in touch with House leadership, encouraging a “climate-smart” rebuild following the coronavirus pandemic “with the future in mind.” And according to McEachin spokesperson Ralph Jones, SEEC’s detailed outline of policy priorities will come in the form of a letter from the group’s eight leaders, with the goal of supporting a future recovery bill.
April 13, 2020 In The News
Though certain industries may benefit from the rollbacks, the costs will accrue to public health. As explained by U.S. Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.), the top Democrat on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, the rollback of emissions standards “will lead to dirtier air at a time when our country is working around the clock to respond to a respiratory pandemic whose effects may be exacerbated by air pollution.” Likewise, members of the Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition strongly opposed the decision to suspend environmental enforcement because it will “only add to the severity of the COVID-19 crisis” and likely lead to “adding patients to health care providers' already overwhelming caseloads.”
April 6, 2020 In The News
Massachusetts Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey are slamming Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance that eased environmental compliance standards amid the coronavirus pandemic, joining a chorus of other Democrats and environmentalists who oppose the action. Last week, lawmakers in the House Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition called the guidance “irresponsible” and said in a letter that it “neglects the Agency’s core mission to protect public health.”
March 31, 2020 In The News
Guidance released by the agency last week informed companies they would not face fines or other enforcement actions from the agency for failing to monitor and report their pollution. “This suspension of enforcement during the ongoing COVID-19 health crisis is irresponsible and neglects the Agency’s core mission to protect public health,” lawmakers in the House Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition (SEEC) wrote in a letter spearheaded by Rep. Mike Quigley (D-Ill.).
March 31, 2020 Press Release

Washington D.C. – Today the leaders of the House Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition (SEEC) sent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler a letter condemning the Agency’s March 26 memorandum announcing that the EPA will cease all enforcement actions during the coronavirus pandemic.

The letter sent today reads in part: